Many laws are certainly not absolute truths but are completely human constructs

The interesting thing is that interpretations often cannot be examined by current scientific standards because the legislation itself has no scientific basis but is formulated on the basis of general perceptions and desires.

Visa Kurki (HBL Debate 30.4) welcomes the legal philosophical debate and Sten Palmberg (HBL Debate 30.4) acknowledges the shortcomings of our legal system.

In fact, lately we have witnessed very strange ups and downs and heard different interpretations by lawyers – even in our country – regarding what is correct or constitutional and so on. It was a surprise that the government, which should have had informed members and had the opportunity to consult with others, was able to come up with directives that contradict existing laws, which could certainly be changed if needed.

Lawyers can come to different interpretations and conclusions of laws other attorneys have been involved in enacting which is completely humane and understandable. Recently we were able to read about the difficulties interpreting take-back terms at housing companies.

The interesting thing is that interpretations often cannot be examined by current scientific standards because the legislation itself has no scientific basis but is formulated on the basis of general perceptions and desires. Often it is the opinion of the highest court that ultimately decides what is right, sometimes after the vote … In the United States, judges are elected for life and usually on political grounds, which clearly weakens the “independent” position of the court.

It is understood that since the supposed independence of the statutes is not affected by either Bergau or Korky at all; If not much to add. Law and politics belong to each other, because laws in our country are enacted by a political body, the Riksdag, which has the highest authority.

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It is clear that society does not function without laws and regulations. But it might be a good idea to keep in mind that many of the laws are not really absolute truths but are completely human combinations. What is right and wrong is in many cases a matter of opinions. In the natural sciences and other disciplines, one tries to approach truth with the help of scientific methods and standards, but is this possible in law? No, not in my opinion!

Law education may continue in universities – it is always good to have the opportunity to network with other disciplines. From the ancient tradition, there are also other materials that have a place in the world of the university, although it may not be classified as a science in the narrow sense of the word.

Jean-Eric Engvall Helsinki


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