It is in Putin’s best interest for Trump to continue as president

Putin may be very grateful to Trump for his apparent support for Brexit and contributing to the United States’ growing interest in the European Union, as well as a number of international agreements and cooperation bodies.

The presidential election in the United States won’t actually take place until December 14, when 538 voters will cast their ballots. Joe Biden won the majority of registered voters in all states in the November 3 election. The way they vote on December 14 may surprise Biden, the Democrats, and the world at large who had faithfully hoped for a change in the White House. Even so, it is surprising that the vast majority of the media had indeed chosen to declare Biden president.

So what could change the conclusion with which the media served us somewhat indifferently and so gladly received?

We have noticed Trumplägret’s reluctance to agree to the election result on November 3. We read about their demands to reject the vote and the election procedures themselves. We know Donald Trump has ample resources to spoil the key people. We have also expressed our growing concern about the politicized partisan judiciary, including the Supreme Court. We are astonished by the undemocratic elements of the US political system, “Winner Takes All”.

The rule in the United States is that presidential voters reflect the majority votes in the state, but according to experience, this is only a criterion. In many places, state councils have the opportunity to assume the right to appoint voters. Then the Republican state government in states where Biden won can ignore the people’s vote and still designate the Republican voters who vote for Trump (see “Increasing Fears Among Biden Supporters” article, HBL 16.11).

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There is a certain risk of corruption here.

After getting acquainted with Catherine Pelton’s new brand based on the extensive experience book “Putin’s People”, everything seems possible. Beltone, who for seven years worked as a British correspondent for the Financial Times in Moscow, offers in the book an insight and detail how Putin and his “gang” (many copies in Russian) since the fall of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s have sought to influence, among other things, Donald Trump’s actions and even the political process in the United States.

Pelton describes a semi-fraternal relationship, but above all, a financial relationship between many of Putin’s men and Trump. Many Russian oligarchs have saved Trump from clear bankruptcies and most economic problems related to “cleansed” money. The real impact Trump and Hillary Clinton aspired to for the presidency was much stronger than what we learned from other sources. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s conclusions were applied immediately before the 2016 presidential election, but Trump’s dealings with Putin have already been going on for a quarter of a century.

Putin’s men wanted, with several billion “well-washed” funds, to conceal their criminal fortunes and influence political processes in the central countries.

It is not entirely unreasonable that Trump’s “America first” slogan was launched or supported by Putin’s gangs. The more Trump focuses on the United States and the dominance of the Republicans, the less interested he is in disrupting Russia’s ambitions elsewhere in the world. Putin may be very grateful to Trump for his apparent support for Brexit and contributing to the United States’ growing interest in the European Union, as well as a number of international agreements and cooperation bodies.

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It is clearly in Putin’s best interest for Trump to continue as president. Billions of his gang could be washed away by funding Trump’s activities, both those that continue to influence the final outcome of the presidential election and private enterprise.

Perhaps the US presidential election has yet to be decided. “Money talks”, money speaks in America, even no matter how it originated and how good it is. The more fanatical Republicans may have a hard time imagining life without President Trump and may be tempted to override the principles of international law in the world’s oldest democracy (sic) for the sake of a single, interesting “special mission”.

Tom Palberg, Log in to


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